PROBLEM

Care3’s client wanted a digital solution to creating an Incident Report that would decrease phone calls made to the PACE (Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) center and eliminating the use of a paper form.

Care3’s clients were seeing an increase in phone calls to the PACE center every time a patient or their family member reported an incident. To decrease the amount of phone calls they were receiving and recording information on paper, they tasked us with the challenge to create a digital Incident Report, a form that notifies the clinician team about a patient’s fall or injuries, as well as give the care team an option to see the results in a data chart on the Care3 mobile app.


MY ROLE & our timeline

I worked as solo UX Designer at Care3 apart of a half remote team, focusing on Research, Experience Design, and Data Visualization.

Collaborating with a company of 8 other teammates (3 Founders, a Product Manager, the CTO, and 3 developers), we completed this project in 5 months. Working with a remote CPO, CTO, CMO, and Project Manager was challenging especially since there were no processes or organization in place which caused this project to take longer than expected since we kept on iterating on user flows, designs and wireflows. During this project, we found a routine using Slack, Google Docs, Lucidchart, and Pivotal Tracker to communicate and found a streamlined process of completing projects.

Care3 Timeline.jpg

Checking out the competition

We conducted a competitor analysis to see if any competitors in the health/wellness category were offering what our clients were looking for and to spark design inspiration.

Our assumptions were correct in guessing that no other competitor offered a mobile incident report but found design inspiration for the mobile notification from Healthloop and data graphs from CareZone.

 

Direct Competitors

 
 

My Design Inspirations

 
Healthloop  - We noticed that Healthloop was breaking the typically convention of a chat bubble so our Stakeholders felt that this would work for us as well so I took this into consideration for my design.

Healthloop - We noticed that Healthloop was breaking the typically convention of a chat bubble so our Stakeholders felt that this would work for us as well so I took this into consideration for my design.

CareZone  - the app by CareZone was the only competitor that offered graphs based off of data that was entered by a care team on mobile so this is where I found my inspiration when I tackled the data visualization step.

CareZone - the app by CareZone was the only competitor that offered graphs based off of data that was entered by a care team on mobile so this is where I found my inspiration when I tackled the data visualization step.

 

UNDERSTANDING THE USERS

Once we checked out the competition, I wanted to understand our users, we identified 8 different users but focused on the Care Coordinator and the Patient since they both would use the Care3 app the most.

I met with a few different Care Coordinators from PACE centers and got to speak with them about their job and caring for patients in the program which is how I identified our two personas. After talking to the Care Coordinators, I noticed that they were carrying around massive binders to record each patients information; the amount of paperwork they had and the number of calls they would receive confirmed our teams hypothesis that a digital incident report would alleviate their workload.

 

Care Coordinator

The Patient

 
 
 

Flow of our users

After understanding our users, we needed to figure out where these new features would fit into the current app flow and how each user would interact with it.

Users already found the mobile app complicated to use, to decrease their confusion, we wanted to make sure any new feature that we added would not make their experience worse. Creating a user flow helped the team visualize how the app would work as well as brought some organization to the team.

Scenario: Charlie (the Patient), coming back from vacation, steps off of an airplane and realizes he has bluish fingernails and toenails. He needs to notify his PACE care team so he opens up his Care3 app and fills out an Incident Report form. His Care Coordinator, Maria, is notified and follows up with Charlie and his care team for next steps.

 
IR user flow.png
 

Designing the new features

After understanding how the Care Coordinators and their patients would interact with the digital incident report, we started an iterative design process.

There was a lot of complexity on how this new feature would work and while half our team was remote, it meant that we needed to utilize our time in the office when out-of-town teammates were in-office…so I started to whiteboard and sketch ideas and then went through several rounds of designs until we all came to agreement.

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I focused on designing 4 key areas: an updated menu, Incident Report form, the chat notification, and data visualization of the incidents displayed in a graph. At this stage, I learned that there was hesitation from the development team to complete the notifications and graphs. They were concerned with building a chat bubble that had clickable elements inside and creating mobile graphs since no one had built either of these items before.

 
Charlie wants to report his bluish skin to his care team, so he enters the chat conversation.

Charlie wants to report his bluish skin to his care team, so he enters the chat conversation.

He selects the Incident Report button from the menu.

He selects the Incident Report button from the menu.

A blank Incident Report form opens and he begins to fill in his information.

A blank Incident Report form opens and he begins to fill in his information.

 
 
Charlie completes all the required information then hits the save button.

Charlie completes all the required information then hits the save button.

A notification of the incident appears in the conversation giving Charlie’s care team a quick alert.

A notification of the incident appears in the conversation giving Charlie’s care team a quick alert.

Maria, the Care Coordinator, can now view Charlie’s new incident as well as previous symptoms in his history care plan charts.

Maria, the Care Coordinator, can now view Charlie’s new incident as well as previous symptoms in his history care plan charts.

 

INTERACTION DESIGN

After the high-fidelity designs were complete, wireflows were created to guide development.

Development had expressed their concerns in building a chat bubble that was different from the norm as well as building mobile graphs since the team did not have experience in either of those areas. The design for the notification changed after speaking with the CTO on what he could build instead but for the rest of the feature, we thought it would be helpful to give the development team a guided wireflow of how each screen or button would interact along with detailed notes linking to specific stories in Pivotal Tracker to make their job easier. They found this process to be helpful so we implemented it into all future sprints.


LESSONS LEARNED

I faced some challenges from the development team, not realizing that they did not have the experience needed to create the data graphs even when utilizing a Javascript library. I expressed my concern for my designs being built out and the company ended up turning to outside contractors to complete the work.

The internal and external developers worked together to complete the designs and we delivered this product on time to the client.

 

outcomes

We accomplished our goal of decreasing phone calls to the PACE center by 60% and they praised us for decreasing their workload as well.

Care3 has truncated the provision of service, the communication of that service to participant and family, and the documentation of that service down from days to minutes.
— Michael Hickey, Administrator, Senior Care Services, AltaMed

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